The Perihelion Effect

  • 00 Days To Earth Sun Closest Point

perihelion January 4, 2020

Calendar

related to the formal division of the year and its evolution through history. Calendars have changed, evolved, gone extinct and been reinvented over time. How we measure time is a reflection of our collective consciousness.

Are December’s solstice and January’s perihelion related?

By EarthSky in Astronomy Essentials | Space | January 1, 2018 December solstice 2017 was December 21. Earth is closest to the sun for 2018 on January 2-3. Coincidence? Earth and sun via ISS Expedition 13/ NASA. Earth comes closest to the sun on January 3, 2018 at around 5:35 UTC; translate to your time zone. This event is called Earth’s perihelion. …

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zodiac, calendars and the eccentric orbit of the planet

What is the relationship between the calendar, the zodiac and the eccentric orbit of the planet?   Thought Experiment:  Many cultures have devised different calendar configurations.  What are the similarities and what do they share in common?   Or the Hebrew Lunar Calendar    

January Esoteric Holidays

https://www.northernway.org/mysteryschool/tag/perihelion/ JANUARY ESOTERIC HOLIDAYS Jan 1 – Jan 31 January/Janus – Dedicated to Old Roman God-Goddess Janus – Jana, who knows both past and future. Jan 2 thru 3 Feast of Old Greek Goddess Hekate / Hecate– who guides all through transitions and crisis. Jan 3 or 4 Earth Perihelion – when the Earth is closest to the Sun. (It is …

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The analemma

You may have wondered what that figure eight loop drawn on a globe is. It is the analemma. In astronomy, an analemma is a diagram showing the variation of the position of the Sun in the sky over the course of a year, as viewed at a fixed time of day and from a fixed …

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Today I found out the Earth is hottest when it is furthest from the Sun on its orbit, not when it is closest

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2011/12/the-earth-is-hottest-when-it-is-furthest-from-the-sun-on-its-orbit-not-when-it-is-closest/ Today I found out the Earth is hottest when it is furthest from the Sun on its orbit, not when it is closest. During the period when the Earth is furthest from the sun (aphelion), the average temperature of the entire planet is about 4°F (2.3°C) higher than when it is closest to the sun …

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World Views: 
from fragmentation to integration

The authors offer the following text to the public both realistically and with hope. Within the scientific world, large-scale movements tending towards unification seem powerless confronted with the information explosion of research and historicism in the philosophy of science. Outside of science, we notice also that both religious and secular ideologies claiming to energize mass …

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Winter Solstice

Winter Solstice — from Eric Weisstein’s World of Astronomy   As the Earth travels around the Sun in its orbit, the north-south position of the Sun changes over the course of the year due to the changing orientation of the Earth’s tilted rotation axes with respect to the Sun. ThisQuickTime movie illustrates the tilt of the Earth’s equatorial plane …

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Gnomon is the part of a sundial that casts the shadow

Gnomon A gnomon ([ˈnoʊmɒn], from Greek γνώμων, gnōmōn, literally: “one that knows or examines”[1][2]) is the part of a sundial that casts the shadow. The term has come to be used for a variety of purposes in mathematics and other fields. History Anaximander (610–546 BC) is credited with introducing this Babylonianinstrument to the Greeks.[3] Oenopides used the phrase drawn gnomon-wise to describe a line drawn perpendicular to another.[4] Later, the term …

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Frequently Asked Questions about Calendars

Frequently Asked Questions about Calendars Version 2.8 Claus Tøndering 15 December 2005 URL: http://www.tondering.dk/claus/calendar.html Copyright and disclaimer This document is Copyright ⃝c 2005 by Claus Tøndering. E-mail: claus@tondering.dk. (Please include the word “calendar” in the subject line.) The document may be freely distributed, provided this copyright notice is included and no money is charged for …

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Equinoxes, Solstice, Cross Quarters shown as seasonal cusps, worshipped by pagans and later religious holidays

http://www.archaeoastronomy.com/seasons.html http://www.archaeoastronomy.com/countdowns.html   http://www.archaeoastronomy.com/seasonal_cusps.mp4 Until 500 years ago most people other than a few far-sighted philosophical scientists imagined the sun, the planets and the stars all revolved around a stationary earth. After all, the same heavenly track made by the sun during the day is the planetary passageway at night. Eventually, the earth was shown …

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