The Perihelion Effect

Science | Pseudo-Science | Conjecture

How the Sun Affects Our Minds

More than three-quarters of all instances of human unrest—battles, upheavals, riots, revolutions, and wars—occur during the periods of the maximum number of sunspots in the Sun… So powerful is this cosmic zeitgeber that it may even influence our physical size, our longevity, our mental stability, our propensity to violence, and possibly even what we consider our uniquely …

How the Sun Affects Our Minds Read More »

Depression, mental illness and mood swings in the third world

There is inconclusive data regarding seasonal affected mood disorder in the third world.  This is due in large part to a lack of research funds.  However an interesting study has been proposed that will compare specific mental illness found in the developed world and chart occurrence of mood disorders and correlate that seasonality to see how …

Depression, mental illness and mood swings in the third world Read More »

Revisiting the “Christmas Holiday Effect” in the Southern Hemisphere

Journal of the American Heart Association Abstract Background A “Christmas holiday effect” showing elevated cardiovascular mortality over the Christmas holidays (December 25 to January 7) was demonstrated previously in study from the United States. To separate the effect of seasonality from any holiday effect, a matching analysis was conducted for New Zealand, where the Christmas …

Revisiting the “Christmas Holiday Effect” in the Southern Hemisphere Read More »

World Views: 
from fragmentation to integration

The authors offer the following text to the public both realistically and with hope. Within the scientific world, large-scale movements tending towards unification seem powerless confronted with the information explosion of research and historicism in the philosophy of science. Outside of science, we notice also that both religious and secular ideologies claiming to energize mass …

World Views: 
from fragmentation to integration Read More »

Occurrence of suicide and seasonal variation

Occurrence of suicide and seasonal variation. Retamal P, Humphreys D. Departamento de Psiquiatria y Salud Mental, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile. nhorwitz@bello.dic.uchile.cl OBJECTIVE: To review the estimated suicide rates for the Region Metropolitan, the main socio-political center in Chile, for the period 1979-1994, and to determine whether they follow a seasonal pattern. …

Occurrence of suicide and seasonal variation Read More »

What do Kepler’s Elliptical orbits have to do with the Holidays?

Consider this; As the winter holidays approach, the earth is approaching the sun.  It is gaining velocity at an increasing rate.  This acceleration increases until the earth reaches perihelion.  Then it begins to move away and decrease acceleration until around July 4th. So here it is, just at the time that we start to mark …

What do Kepler’s Elliptical orbits have to do with the Holidays? Read More »

The origin of Halloween

Halloween’s origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1. This day marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the …

The origin of Halloween Read More »

observing the body’s cycle

I think that the ancients realized this relationship through yoga and self study. By observing the body’s cycle superimposed over the calendar’s these sages and shamen made predictions based on their understanding of the celestial dynamics.  As records and observations improved, the calendar has changed significantly and holidays moved to suit these observations.  The heliocentric understanding of universe seemed …

observing the body’s cycle Read More »

Seasonal effects on suicide rates

Seasonal effects on suicide rates Research on seasonal effects on suicide rates suggests that the prevalence of suicide is greatest during the late spring and early summermonths,[1] despite the common belief that suicide rates peak during the cold and dark months of the winter season.[2] General effects The Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Center for Health Statistics report that suicide rates in the United States are lowest …

Seasonal effects on suicide rates Read More »

Earth at Perihelion

Earth at Perihelion On January 4, 2001, our planet made its annual closest approach to the Sun.Listen to this story (requires RealPlayer) January 4, 2001 — This morning at 5 o’clock Eastern Standard time (0900 UT) Earth made its annual closest approach to the Sun — an event astronomers call perihelion. Northerners shouldn’t expect any relief from the …

Earth at Perihelion Read More »

Abductive reasoning

Abductive reasoning “Abductive” redirects here. For other uses, see Abduction (disambiguation). Abductive reasoning (also called abduction,[1] abductive inference[2] or retroduction[3]) is a form of logical inference which goes from an observation to a theory which accounts for the observation, ideally seeking to find the simplest and most likely explanation. In abductive reasoning, unlike in deductive reasoning, the premises do not guarantee the conclusion. One can understand abductive …

Abductive reasoning Read More »

Gnomon is the part of a sundial that casts the shadow

Gnomon A gnomon ([ˈnoʊmɒn], from Greek γνώμων, gnōmōn, literally: “one that knows or examines”[1][2]) is the part of a sundial that casts the shadow. The term has come to be used for a variety of purposes in mathematics and other fields. History Anaximander (610–546 BC) is credited with introducing this Babylonianinstrument to the Greeks.[3] Oenopides used the phrase drawn gnomon-wise to describe a line drawn perpendicular to another.[4] Later, the term …

Gnomon is the part of a sundial that casts the shadow Read More »